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07/22/2013

Unearthing a duck-billed hadrosaur

PALEONTÓLOGOS DEL INAH Y LA UNAM CON APOYO DEL GOBIERNO MUNICIPAL RECUPERARON 50 VÉRTEBRAS COMPLETAS DE LA COLA DE UN HADROSAURIO, TAMBIÉN LLAMADO PICO DE PATO. FOTO MAURICIO MARAT. INAH.
Paleontologists work on the fossilized skeleton of what they believe is a duck-billed hadrosaur, among the last and most common dinosaurs to roam the earth. The skeleton was discovered in 2005 in Coahuila state, abutting Texas, but an official dig didn't begin till July 2. So far, according to a press release from the National Institute of Anthropology and History (which provided the photo), the paleontologists have uncovered some 50 vertebrae of the giant beast, revealing details of articulation that will help scientists learn more about the way the bipedal hadrosaur moved about. The location of the dig is near the town of General Cepeda, in an area that is known for its fossilized dinosaur bones.  

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